comics, comics criticism, dc comics, marvel, Perspectives, writing

The Urbane Turtle 2021 Year in Review – The Comics

In 2020, in the first couple months of this Urbane Turtle experiment, I posted a Year in Review of some of the various forms of media that got me through a difficult year. I was very explicit that it wasn’t a “Best-Of,” and I did not limit it to any medium.

But after a full year as a semi-professional comic critic, I want to share with you my Top 10 comics from the year that was. There is not much in the way of ground rules for how books qualify for this list. They had to release new issues in 2021. I’ve spent the last 2 weeks catching up on a backlog of releases and am happy to finally share this with you all.

Continue reading “The Urbane Turtle 2021 Year in Review – The Comics”
Radiant Black volume 1 cover, art by Marcelo Costa. Radiant Black soars through the sky in a superhero pose.
comics, Perspectives, writing

COMICSXF Interview: Kyle Higgins Breaks Down the First Arc of Image’s Radiant Black

For ComicsXF, I chatted with writer Kyle Higgins about the first arc of Radiant Black. We got into his philosophy of superheroes and the responsibility to take risks he feels in writing an independent comic. Read the interview here.

radiant black
comics, comics criticism, Perspectives, writing

A Millennial Superhero out to make a difference in RADIANT BLACK #1

In Image Comics Radiant Black #1, Nathan Burnett is a thirty year old screw up who is too scared to pursue his dream of being a writer. He returns to his boyhood home in small town Illinois to live with his parents and dig himself out of crippling debt. While there he is reunited with an old friend who pushes him to open up about his fear and failure for the first time. After a night of drinking beer and catching up with one another, the two stumble upon a strange glowing black sphere on the train tracks. After touching it, Nathan is encased in a sleek alien suit of armor and suddenly finds himself with new powers that, so far, seem to allow him to levitate items as large as a train and fly through the air.

A millennial superhero with something to prove, Nathan’s generational downward mobility leaves him lost and his grand dreams of the future out of reach. It’s a familiar sorrow for many of us who came of age in the years following one of the worst economic collapses in American history, only to be met with a new economic collapse just as we thought we were starting to get a handle on adulthood. 

Continue reading “A Millennial Superhero out to make a difference in RADIANT BLACK #1”